Re-foaming Beyer M380

I’m lucky enough to own two Beyer M380, and since they’re both probably over 20 years old, their foam needed to be replaced. In one microphone (gold M380) the foam was almost completely gone, but for the other it was more of a precautionary measure – the foam had holes in it, but wasn’t exposing the whole capsule. Anyway, these guys can go bad if even a small hair gets in the capsule, so it’s a good idea to replace the foam as soon as it starts showing signs of breakdown.

Greg from Electrical Audio tipped me off to McMaster Carr and said to search their website for “the thinnest Reusable Polyurethane Foam Air Filter”. It’s this one, and in case the link goes dead in the future, the catalog number is 9803K301. The thinnest one is 1/8″ thick, and that’s the same thickness of the foam that’s already in the microphones.

The next question is the porosity, 30 or 60 pores per inch? I got both and compared them to the existing foam in the microphone. The answer is 60 PPI. See for yourself!

The difference between 30 and 60 pores per inch is very obvious:

One sheet was enough to re-foam two microphones with some extra material left over.

There’s really not a lot to it once the microphone is open. One side the body comes off completely and the other is holding the capsule in place with a couple of screws.

I started on the gold microphone because its foam was in worse shape. However, it was deteriorating so badly that I couldn’t use the old foam as a template. So in retrospect, I should have started with the black M380 whose foam was in a better shape. Anyway, it took a bit of experimenting to figure out how to cut the foam. Like I said, it’s better to use the old foam as a template, but if it’s in rough shape, start with a square that is bigger than the grill. Fit the square of foam in the “tub”, and cut the four lines for the corners. Now the foam is overlapping at the corners and need to be trimmed. This is kind of tricky and here’s what I learned: the body of the mic has these vertical slats, right? They go all the way around to the rim of the tub, so if you cut to much foam along the length of the tub, you might leave holes in the foam that overlap with a slat. That’s bad. So the trick is to cut the excess at the top and bottom of the tub. Also, make sure to first cut the lines for the posts where the screws go in. Anyway, that’s basically the only tip I have for how to actually cut the foam. Here are a couple of shots of how my foam pieces turned out.

And the two M380s fully re-foamed.

 

Old foam (from the black M380):

img_20160915_211949

Important: Don’t try to glue the foam to the grill, that’s not how it’s supposed to be and the glue will probably eat the foam. When I got my black M380 I was dumb and decided to glue it to the grill, and when I re-foamed it I had to clean out a bunch of old gunk. It sucked.

(This was done in September, but I only now remembered to post about it)

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